In fall and winter, area chefs dish up duck, venison, rabbit and more

By Pam George | Photographs by Scott Nathan
From the Holiday 2019 issue

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Culinary Coast diners tend to gravitate toward seafood. But at this time of year, many Sussex County chefs are looking inland for inspiration. In autumn and winter, game starts appearing on many coastal restaurant menus. “It’s that time of year,” says Richard Davis, chef and co-owner of Michy’s. “The weather is changing, and people want comfort food.” At his Rehoboth-area restaurant, that means duck and venison.

Bryan Hickman, of Hickman’s Meat Market near Rehoboth, would agree. The market sells rabbit all year long, but sales soar when the temperature drops. “I usually fill the case once a month, but when the weather got cooler, I had to fill it twice in a few weeks,” he says. “Four or five people came in wanting to make rabbit stew — it’s extremely seasonal.”

 

 

Local veterans recount their service in World War II

By Lynn R. Parks | Photographs by Scott Nathan
From the Holiday 2019 issue

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Time is growing short for Americans to collect the stories of those who lived through World War II. This year marks the 80th anniversary of the start of the war, and soldiers, sailors and Marines who were sent overseas to fight the Axis powers — even those who were just out of high school when they enlisted or got their draft notices — are well into their 90s.

The men often have inspiring stories to tell. And at the end of the second decade of the 21st century, there’s much to be said for hearing tales of bravery and conviction, of loyalty to country and of faith in a better future.

 

 

 

Literary ambitions are just part of what fuel Terri Clifton’s commitment to touching others’ lives

By Lynn R. Parks | Photographs by Carolyn Watson
From the Holiday 2019 issue

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Before Chad Clifton left for Iraq with his Marine Corps unit, he asked his mother to promise, if something happened to him while he was overseas, to write the story of his life.

“I made that promise, knowing that I was screwed,” Terri Clifton says. And in February 2005, when she received word that her son had been killed in a mortar strike, “that was the first thing that I thought: ‘Now, I have to write that damn book.’”