Lobster bisque gets a boost from Asian flavors

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From the May 2019 issue

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There are certain dishes associated with celebrations, vacations and self-gratification. Lobster tail is one. Steak is another. Along the coast, three steakhouses feature both, as well as the classic surf-and-turf combo.

It stands to reason that where there is lobster, there is often lobster bisque. But don’t expect the standard creamy creation at Harvest Tide Steakhouse in Lewes. Chef Danio Somoza’s Thai lobster bisque sports an Asian flair.

“It has the perfect balance of sweet and savory flavors,” says Somoza, who owns the restaurant with wife Gabby, brother Enrique Somoza and Enrique’s wife, Taryn.

Mix of Asian and Mexican ingredients elevate this dish beyond the beans and rice

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From the April 2019 issue

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With so many ethnic restaurants in the resort area, it’s hard to believe that coastal Delaware was once a desert for global cuisine. Today, you’re likely to find Asian, Latin and other international flavors on the menus of mainstream restaurants.

And those with an ethnic twist aren’t limited to traditional ingredients. Consider the shrimp bowl at Papa Grande’s Coastal Taqueria in Fenwick Island. As expected, it’s made with black beans, rice and ancho powder. But it also has soy sauce and cilantro. The latter, a staple of Mexican cuisine, is known as coriander in Asia, where it’s also a go-to herb.

Best associated with Asian cuisine, bowl dishes — Buddha bowls, acai bowls and poke bowls — were likely inspired by the meals of Buddhist monks, who received charitable food donations in bowls. In today’s trendsetting towns, they’re associated with healthy eating.

Colorful frutti di mare is a crowd-pleaser for holiday meals

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From the Holiday 2018 issue

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As the holidays approach, many Italian-Americans along the coast are planning the Feast of the Seven Fishes, a traditional Christmas Eve meal. But ask Francesco Agostino, a native of Italy, about the meatless feast and you’ll get a puzzled look. “I’ve never heard of it,” says Agostino, the chef at Azzurro Italian Oven and Bar in Rehoboth Beach, which he owns with wife Tonya.

Perhaps that’s because Agostino comes from Turin in northern Italy, and the feast — also known as La Vigilia (“The Vigil”) — is a southern Italy inspiration. Though unfamiliar with that meal, he is well acquainted with seafood. There are meat dishes on his Azzurro menu, but seafood is the star.

The couple chose Rehoboth Beach for the restaurant’s location because it reminds them of walkable beach towns in Italy. They selected the 19th-century building — best remembered as the former home of Chez la Mer — for its character. “We didn’t want anything modern,” he says.