Dedicated volunteers have resurrected a World War II installation that’s being repurposed with history — and festive occasions — in mind

By Pam George | Photograph by Kevin Fleming
From the August 2017 issue

feature-fortmiles Our Content - Delaware Beach Life - Results from #69Dedicated volunteers have resurrected a World War II installation that’s being repurposed with history — and festive occasions — in mind

There are few things that make Gary Wray and Pat Bragdon as happy as a World War II-era Army gun, no matter how rusted and worn it is. On a sunny day in Cape Henlopen State Park, the men stand like proud papas next to a formidable-looking 90 mm anti-aircraft gun, which is sitting on a blue tarp, nose pointing toward a tree line.

“It’s an M2,” notes Wray, a retired Cape Henlopen School District administrator. “That means model two.” The standard U.S. anti-aircraft and anti-tank gun in 1943, an M2 was present at Fort Miles, the Army base that once occupied the park grounds.

Beach-banner pilots rely on skill and some degree of daring to get their messages aloft

By Robert Bateman |  Photograph by Kevin Fleming
From the August 2017 issue

feature-bannerplanes Our Content - Delaware Beach Life - Results from #69The takeoff of the single-engine Piper Super Cub is unremarkable. Accelerating down the runway, the small aircraft moves faster and faster until it lifts off the ground and rises into the sky.

It is the next few minutes that amaze.

Entering a figure-8 pattern above the runway, the pilot opens his window and throws out a cable that dangles behind and slightly below the aircraft; at the end of that line, though difficult to see from the ground, is a grapnel hook.

The pilot then banks and passes over a small group of people off to the side of the runway, who stand near two thin poles and a pair of orange cones.

From his teenage years on, catching a wave was more than just a thrill for Gary Revel

By Lynn R. Parks  |  Photograph by Nick Gruber
From the August 2017 issue

feature-garyrevel Our Content - Delaware Beach Life - Results from #69When a heart attack brought that to a halt, he had to heal to surf again. But in healing, he had to share his story about being beckoned by death.

A couple years ago, Gary Revel and his son Michael loaded up their surfboards and headed from their home near Ocean View to Assateague Island, south of Ocean City, Md. Gary, who in his teens and 20s was considered by many to be the best surfer in coastal Delaware, hadn’t been out on the water in a while. But Michael had a new board and was eager to try it.